Not too long ago I created a web app called Nalarama!, which was designed to be a controlled form where my friends and family could submit guesses on the different breeds of our mixed breed puppy as a contest with points and the whole nine yards. Then once the results from her DNA test came back I wanted to be able to send the results in a professional manner, but was unsure of how to send emails with a templated look instead of just text and attachments, a signature, etc.

So I have spent the last few days trying to…


This past week or so I switched up my mac’s terminal from bash to zsh, and I have been enjoying personalizing my terminal just how I like it. I installed a framework called oh-my-zsh and I really like how easy it is to customize, I highly recommend it.

However, one of my buddies showed me his terminal when I was first starting at Flatiron School, and I was fascinated by some artwork he had at the top of his new terminal window. It was ASCII art, and I had no clue how he did it!

At the time I was…


This week I want to write about a trick I have been using in my terminal lately, reverse searching. I just learned about this, and I have been kicking myself for not learning about it sooner. Hopefully it will come in handy for you as much as it has for me if you haven’t seen this already!

First off, I was using bash as my shell for a long time, and just switched to zsh (and installed Oh My Zsh, it’s awesome!), let me tell you, I was living under a rock. I love it!

This reverse searching tip is…


Photo by Victor Barrios on Unsplash

I recently built an app for my family and friends called Nalarama, and I was reminded of how useful controlled forms are. In my app, I ask users to make multiple guesses on my puppy’s mix of breeds, which requires multiple inputs. With controlled form inputs, the value typed into the input is easily accessible, and I was able to effortlessly use those values in HTTP POST requests, and also in JSX elements wherever I deemed necessary.

This post will be a glimpse into controlled inputs, and will demonstrate what that looks like when using React Hooks.

First and foremost…


This week I found myself diving back into Ruby on Rails. Mostly because I recently came up with an idea for an app I want to build which requires a back end. My dog recently had her DNA sent in to a doggy DNA testing site, and I want to build a simple form page my family and friends can visit, guess up to 5 different breeds, and submit their answers to the database so I can ultimately tally up each persons score and send out a results email.

I quickly started realizing I hadn’t worked with Ruby in awhile…


I wrote an article a couple weeks ago about some of the commands and shortcuts that can help improve workflow for those of us using VSCode as our editor. Since then, I have found some more tricks, and figured a ‘Part 2’ was in order! Be sure to check my first post as well as this one, you can find it here.

I said it in the other post, and it is relevant in this one, some of the tips I’ll be discussing may be available in other editors, but I personally am not 100% sure so I don’t want…


I was inspired to write about sorting an array by two different variables because of an issue I ran into while creating a project I was working on for Flatiron School before I graduated. I wanted to create a “Top Ten Leaderboard” which sorted the leaders by one variable first, then sorted them again by a different variable.

In this case I wanted to sort by the amount of time the user took to complete the game, and then sort by the amount of “misses” they made throughout their game session.

Let’s discuss what that might look like. For example…


This week I’ve been learning a few new shortcuts on VSCode, and I am wishing I knew about these sooner! I want to share some of the shortcuts and tricks I’ve found useful as a beginner, and demonstrate how to use them to improve your workflow!

These tips are intended to save time and keystrokes, and also make navigating the code editor easier. As they say — work smarter, not harder — and don’t ask me who “they” are!

To be honest, VSCode is the only editor I’ve ever used, but it’s possible this article could relate to other editors…


Hello everyone! This week I have been doing a little more working with Vue to expand my front end horizons, and have been interested in learning about conditional rendering and dynamic styling. This article will be focusing on dynamic styling, which simply put, means to make the styling for each element able to change based on the state of certain variables or conditions.

This is what makes Vue and other front end frameworks so amazing for developers! The ability to detect user input, and then instantly update the necessary elements to reflect that input are super valuable dev tools.

For…


I recently started taking a Udemy course for Vue.js and have learned enough to play around with it a bit. I figured I would share my initial thoughts, and what I’ve learned in just a couple days.

In order to demonstrate what I’ve learned, I’ll be building a very simple app from scratch, then I’ll incorporate Vue.js and talk about each step along the way. This post is meant to be an introduction to Vue.js for anyone out there interested in learning but just wants to check it out before they invest more time and energy. …

Tyler J Funk

Full Stack Web Developer && Creative Thinker && Flatiron School Grad && Continuous Learner

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